Tech at Night

Even though repeated losses in court are making the Net Neutrality folks have to compromise with reality, the fact is they’re still freaking out about the ability to charge more for better service, which is a good thing to have. The facts are though that we don’t need new laws, and the laws they do want would just pick winners and losers, which is why Netflix is pushing so hard. If the roles are reversed they’d be screaming that I was being paid by Netflix.

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Tech at Night

Marsha Blackburn says the White House just isn’t credible on privacy. Is she right? Probably. I also think people really don’t care about privacy. Note the lack of an exodus from Google services even now.

I agree that it’s a very smart idea for FCC to eliminate rules that no longer make sense. Having a law, as opposed to the free market, ban phone use on planes, is a pointless power grab. We must defeat all GOP attempts to pass these laws which would have silenced 9/11 victims on the planes. I’d even suggest both Bill Shuster and Lamar Alexander need primary opponents, as they are exposing their big-government tendencies over this.

See, this is smart. We shouldn’t totally rewrite large bills like the Communications Act. We should implement targeted reform, one step at a time. FCC process reform is surely needed, and can be tackled in a standalone way.

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Tech at Night

Regulation must keep up with the needs of modernization. That’s a point new FCC Commissioner Ajit Pai came to RedState to make, particularly with respect to the Internet transformation going on in telecommunications. As the world “goes IP,” and puts everything on the Internet, regulators must adapt. Make sure to read it. Ajit Pai would have a particularly important role as a reformist regulator should Mitt Romney win.

Regulation today just doesn’t make much sense sometimes, a point Broadband for America makes. The point about ‘edge’ vs ‘core’ of the Internet is important. The firm that sits between you and Google is as important to you as Google. They’re all pieces of the puzzle.

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Tech at Night

So, the FCC put out another report (the “706 report”) that just pushes an agenda rather than reporting the true facts about high speed Internet in America. Commissioners McDowell and Pai tell it like it is. We’ve also got Broadband for America telling the story. I’m not even worried about the details: the FCC is saying what they feel they must say to justify expanding government.

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BGR’s error on iOS fragmentation in three words

On June 13, 2012, in General, by Neil Stevens

“Developers, Developers, Developers!”

Yeah, Steve Ballmer was right. His firm’s Windows platform continues to do well in part because it tries to smooth things out for developers. On the other hand, Android developers have a problem working on that platform because despite the releases of new OS versions, huge fractions of the userbase are stuck on Android 2.x. That’s fragmentation.

BGR is highlighting end-user fragmentation, which is not a problem.

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Tech at Night

Earlier we covered Microsoft’s new Pirate Pay, which I said sounded like a DoS attack against copyright infringers. Others agree and say it may be illegal, which is true. Sure enough, Pirate Bay is under DDoS attack. Has Pirate Pay gone rogue? Cybersecurity and copyright, all in one issue.

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Tech at Night

Well, here we are. The reason CISPA was getting all the attention was allegedly that it was coming to a vote first. Well, now Lieberman-Collins is next to a vote, as Democrats scramble to find a way to make cloture. Where’s the outrage? I’ll tell you where it is: non-existent, because CISPA opposition was solely designed to give cover for Lieberman-Collins.

We do need the private sector to have more information, though. Internet attacks aren’t going away.

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Tech at Night

Yup, CISPA is still the top story. It will improve our security, which matters in an age of Chinese and Anarchist Internet attacks. And unlike Lieberman-Collins, Which is the bill being pushed in the Senate, no government power grab is involved.

So the House is right to challenge the President’s push for Lieberman-Collins. Lungren’s PRECISE Act is another bill that would create no new regulations. That’s the kind of approach we need. Remove impediments to greater security. No micromanagement.

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Tech at Night

Am I tired of expressing dissatisfaction with the Obama FCC and other government intrusions? Never!

Al Franken is setting up an unfalsifiable rationale for government action against Verizon and Comcast. Gotta love that, eh?

I’m sure he, the FCC, or both will try to overturn the courts who say bundling is not anticompetitive. I like bundling. It saves me money when I’m buying both things anyway. Then again, I like choices in the marketplace.

Why we want FCC subsidizing tablet makers though, I have no idea.

Chuck Grassley’s threat seems to be working at least, as FCC starts to break down on LightSquared transparency, a necessary step toward being able to confirm the President’s new appointees to the commission.

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